Although this post was first written well over a year ago, the topic is still very relevant, and unfortunately not very well known or widespread.  We have gone through it to update so if you have read it before it is still fresh for you.  As we talk about in our monthly meetups and when talking to new investors, mindset and how we approach things (specially new things) is in many cases the majority of the work, and our largest challenge.  It is much easier to dismiss something you don’t know about rather than take the time to learn and understand it.

This post is not going to focus on Real Estate directly, but rather something that not all of us have, and is very difficult to learn…GRIT.

  • Grit: Perseverance and Passion for long-term goals

What a simple definition for something that could be so difficult, specially if you want it. There was a great TED talk last year by Angela Lee Duckworth that describes Grit as the single attribute that is most common in successful people (Click here to see the 6 minute video, it’s worth it!). IQ, how smart you are, or how fast you learn didn’t have anything to do with it. Life and success are marathons, and those with grit really understand long term goals rather than instant reward. There are so many talented individuals that fail even when they had so many things stacked in their favour. But what is really interesting is those that are not very “talented” or had numerous failures reach mega success.

  • Michael Jordan: cut from his high school basketball team for “lack of skill”
  • The Beatles: rejected many times and told “they have no future in show business”
  • Albert Einstein: did not speak until age 4, described as “mentally slow”
  • Bill Gates: Dropped out of Harvard, failed at his firs business
  • Abraham Lincoln: Failed at 3 businesses, and campaigned 7 times prior to becoming President of the United States
  • Walt Disney: Fired for having a “lack of imagination”
  • Thomas Edison: Teachers told him he was “too stupid to learn anything”
  • Henry Ford: Failed at 3 business prior to succeeding with Ford Motor Company at age 53
  • Richard Bransen & Tom Cruise: Both had dyslexia growing up.

In our corporate lives, we referred to grit as “Drive”, which is almost impossible to teach or coach. There is a great book called “So Good They Can’t Ignore You” by Cal Newport. It talks about how following your passion in your career could be flawed or harmful, and how building skills (or becoming a craftsman) is far superior. Interesting that the book focuses on building skills over the long term rather than simply following a passion (which may be disguised as simply a hobby or interest, specially when we are younger and unsure what we want to do). Society has been telling us to follow our passion for years when maybe it is not really the best advice. In fact, it could lead to frequent career/job changes and more stress/anxiety. Many times, when people follow their passion, they may realize it just wasn’t the right fit for them, or they didn’t know all the work involved. We will not go into the research here, but it is a very interesting read that we found a lot of truth to. Besides, if all of us simply followed our passion, would we have widely successful companies like 1800-Got-Junk? How many people grow up wanting to be accountants, or lawyers? There is some truth that finding a passion could be learned from simply doing and doing and doing …Hmmm, this kinda sounds like Grit!

They use the example of Steve Jobs. He dropped out of college in his early 20’s and became a hippie. Jobs travelled to India to “find enlightenment, visited with monks, became a vegan, did LSD, and also became a Zen Buddhist and artist. Jobs also admitted that if he didn’t work with computers he could see himself being a poet. During this time in his early 20’s he also co-founded Apple, this does not sound like a person following their passion but rather seeing an opportunity and relentlessly going after it. Jobs is an example of a true craftsman who had grit, and through this he developed a passion for what he did with Apple, but by no means was that his passion growing up, or even when he started. Steve Jobs had Grit!

Regardless of if you have passion for something you are working on or not, we recommend to stick through it, it pays back in so many ways when you really want to achieve something later.  It took us many years to learn prior to quitting our corporate jobs and living life on our own terms. Some of those years were filled with business failures and lots of hard work that did not amount to anything. We did not particularly enjoy some of those tough times, but we also would not be where we are today if we did not go through it all and continue.

Visit us at www.VenturePropertyInvestments.com and our pages on facebook or LinkedIn to learn more about how we invest in real estate to profit in both an increasing or decreasing housing market.  Or contact us if you would like to learn how we are providing double digit returns for our partner’s and clients year over year.

Until Next Time,
Build Wealth. Live Life

If you haven’t come out to one of our events, feel free to visit our events page on our site at https://venturepropertyinvestments.com/events/.  If you are just starting out, or a seasoned pro, come out to Learn and Network with others like you.

Martin Kuev & Chris Shebib are full time Real Estate Investors, Realtors and Wealth Coaches who have over 20 years experience in Real Estate.  With multi-million-dollar real estate portfolios and a team built over the past decade, they left the corporate world to have the flexibility to spend time with family, continue their own real estate investments and help others build long-term wealth.

Both Chris & Martin are first and foremost Husbands, and Fathers.  Both are actively involved with their families and each have 3 daughters keeping home life full of surprises.

FREE Updates on Real Estate Investing

Market updates, private deals, hot spots to invest and more, directly to your inbox.  It's free to join!

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Share This